Archive for July 2013

Who Are You Accepting on LinkedIn?

Who Are You Accepting on LinkedIn?

6431448699_e660c09aca_bClients often come to Compass Center seeking career advice on job search techniques and/or how to prepare for a job search. As the world’s largest professional network, LinkedIn remains a leading resource for job seekers. LinkedIn elevates social networking by providing an online platform for professional contacts. But to what extent should limits on professional contacts be pushed? Inspired by a Harvard Business Review blog post, we will explore the three categories of a suitable LinkedIn connection.

The Sharers
Sharers help you stay in the know. LinkedIn places relevant content in your personal feed, so having multiple sharers helps ensure you’re receiving the best news – whether it be local news, industry trends or job opportunities.

The Connectors
The Connector is someone that is extremely plugged in. By adding someone that you already know in a professional capacity, you are able to benefit greatly. Connectors are great for offering introductions to their connections, making suggestions on how to better your profile and inform you of groups or meetups.

The Leaders
Leaders are viewed as experts. They understand social media, especially LinkedIn. They are a combination of Sharers and Connectors. The best leaders are willing to answer questions you may have about bettering your profile, as well as connecting you to groups and other professionals.

LinkedIn isn’t designed to be another Facebook or Twitter. The more strategic, exclusive and intimate connections that can be made, the better.

Question: What do you take into consideration before accepting a LinkedIn invitation?

Tea with Lee Kicks into High Gear for 2013

Tea with Lee Kicks into High Gear for 2013

TWL
Tea with Lee is taking to the big stage this year, as Lee will be joined by Jill McCorkle and Nashville headliners Marshall Chapman and Matraca Berg for an evening of story and song at the Varsity Theater.

Mark your calendar for December 6, 2013.  More details soon!

2014 Through Women’s Eyes, By Women’s Hands

2014 Through Women’s Eyes, By Women’s Hands

TWE
Join us for the 2014 Through Women’s Eyes, By Women’s Hands Art Exhibition and Sale.  Mark your calendar for 
March 7, 2014, at the Top of the Hill Great Room. Again this year we’ll feature  5″ x 7″ anonymous mini-masterpieces by new and seasoned area women artists. We’ll also have a live auction with artists to be announced.

6:00 – 7:00Private Sponsors Reception will include music, appetizers, champagne, and first chance to buy art!
7:00 – 10:00 – Cocktail Reception features music and dancing,  dessert from fabulous women chefs, and raffle items.

Mark your calendar – MARCH 7, 2014 for next spring’s event.

To become a sponsor of the 2014 art show please email Marya.

 

Photos from Martha’s Day – July 8, 2013

Photos from Martha’s Day – July 8, 2013

On July 8, Compass Center for Women and Families celebrated its one year anniversary with Martha’s Day, a day-long celebration in honor of Martha Pearson, a victim of domestic violence. Martha’s Day was generously supported by Vimala’s Curryblossom Café, DSI Comedy and A Better Image Printing. Chapelboro.com attended and took these wonderful photos!

You can still support Martha’s Day through the end of July. Visit www.compassctr.org and donate online. Please write “Martha’s Day” in the “In Honor” section of the online donation form.

Nearly $5,000 Raised for Martha’s Day 2013

Nearly $5,000 Raised for Martha’s Day 2013

Laura and Martha

UPDATE: As of August 5, 2013, we reached $5,000 raised for Martha’s Day!

The following is a guest post from Laura Morrison, the inspired leader of Martha’s Day…In early June, I got an itch to celebrate my mother’s upcoming 60th birthday. Originally, I thought I’d write a simple letter to friends, family and colleagues, encouraging them to donate to Compass Center to honor my mother’s birthday and her life. However, when I shared my plan with Vimala Rajendran (owner of Vimala’s Curryblossom Café), something beautiful happened. We dreamt up Martha’s Day.

During our initial, hour-long conversation, Vimala and I whipped up a rough event plan, and she even nailed down a band to perform at the event. Within days, Compass Center staff jumped on board, support from the business community poured in, and Martha’s Day was up and running.

The effortlessness of planning Martha’s Day was an early indicator of the generosity of our community, and the actual event was a testament to the ability we have to come together and make a powerful difference in our community.

In only a month, we united behind Compass Center and raised nearly $5,000 to bolster the services the Center provides women, men and children facing domestic violence. And we did it all in the name of my mother, Martha.

Martha’s Day was transformational. When we suffer tragedy, it’s easy to get lost in grief. Martha’s Day was my chance to climb out of my grief and publicly celebrate my mother – her strengths, and her weaknesses. I was honored to share her story in the hopes of helping others survive what she did not – domestic violence. Martha’s Day helped me turn my mother’s tragedy into beauty.

The event reminded me how beautiful the power of community is. Martha’s Day would not have happened had Vimala not been excited about hosting an event, had A Better Image not sponsored our invitations, had DSI Comedy not sponsored our raffle, had the MahaloJazz 3 not graciously performed for us, and had Compass Center staff and volunteers – as well as my friends and family – not dedicated their time to volunteer at the event. It was only after those pieces fell into place that we were able to come together and raise significant funds for Compass Center.

I was blown away by the number of people who stopped by Martha’s Day to show their support and donate to Compass Center (and even more blown away that some of my mother’s childhood friends attended!). And I was definitely encouraged to overhear conversations throughout the dinner about ending domestic violence.

Martha’s Day was certainly about raising money for Compass Center and supporting an organization that is doing amazing work in our community. But my greater aim in organizing Martha’s Day was to pull our entire community into an open and honest dialogue about domestic violence. In that regard, I can say without hesitation Martha’s Day was a success.

At the event, I challenged attendees to ask themselves a few questions:

  • What role can we play in ending domestic violence?
  • How can we support and empower victims?
  • How can we love and rehabilitate abusers?
  • What can we do to educate our kids about this type of  violence
  • How can we lend a hand in breaking cycles of abuse?

I don’t have the answers to those questions. They are big, heavy questions. Domestic violence is a problem, and when you’ve been personally touched by it, the problem feels huge and unbeatable and overwhelming. But as I looked around at the many folks who attended Martha’s Day, I saw my friends, coworkers, family and strangers, and I was reminded that no matter how big a problem is, if we work together, we can defeat it.

Martha’s Day was a step in the right direction. Now it’s up to us to continue our community conversation on domestic violence and plow forward toward ending that violence.

For photos from the event, click here.

UPDATE: Senate Budget Eliminates Funding for Displaced Homemaker Programs

UPDATE: Senate Budget Eliminates Funding for Displaced Homemaker Programs

UPDATE (As of 7/24/2013) The 2013-14 budget eliminates the Displaced Homemaker Program by next year. These 35 programs are a self-sufficiency and workforce development programs and one such program is housed at Compass Center. The General Fund appropriation to the program will be eliminated this year. Funds collected by the Divorce Filing Fee that support the program are reduced from $55 per divorce to $35 in FY 2013-14 and are transferred entirely to support the Domestic Violence Center Fund in FY 2014-15. The Domestic Violence Center Fund provides funding related to domestic violence across the State. In FY 2011-12, the Displaced Homemaker Program Fund received $1.8 million from the fee and supported the 35 programs across the state.

Over the past few weeks we’ve asked you to reach out to your legislators to preserve funding for the Compass Center’s self-sufficiency programming.  We’re happy to report that your actions are making a difference!  An amendment to return a portion of the Displaced Homemaker funding to the House budget to preserve our programming and allow us crucial time to refocus and streamline our service delivery model passed unanimously in the House.

However, the fight is not over.  The next step is for the House and Senate to “conference” and work through differences in their respective budgets.  This is where we have to make one more push to see our funding saved!  Please contact the legislators below who serve on the House and Senate conference committees.  They hold the fate of our state funding in their hands.

Below are talking points you may use when you call or email.  Read more about Displaced Homemaker Programs here.

N.C. Displaced Homemaker Program/Talking Points SB 402

  1. Current budget proposal eliminates funding for workforce stabilization:  job preparation/career readiness/support services delivered by Displaced Homemaker program grants. 
  • Last year over 5,000 citizens benefitted from these services. Displaced Homemaker programs currently work directly with Community College systems to increase the job-readiness or to retrain motivated workers to traditional, non-traditional or STEM jobs, all of which can increase the wage earning capacity of citizens needing support
  • Although G.S restricts funding to 35 counties (G.S. 143B-394.5A), many programs serve multi-county regions. No one is turned away due to place of residence.
  • Currently, the NC Council for Women receives and directs divorce filing fees to Domestic Violence Centers.  DV programs only serve victims of sexual abuse/domestic abuse. We estimate that 85% of displaced homemaker clients are not domestic violence survivors.
  • No savings are obtained from moving funding to domestic violence programs in 2014. Cutting 36% of the fees severely hinders the effectiveness of the programs to deliver services. Maintain full $55 per program allocation from divorce filing fees to sustain services and move over 5,000 women/men from dependency to wage earners and taxpayers.
  1. Restore fees from divorce filing applications for Displaced Homemaker Programs in 2013 and 2014.
  1.  Do not phase out the program in 2014 by redirecting fees to domestic violence (DV) programs in 2014. Programs serve different needs and both are important to families in N.C.

“Shifting funding to domestic violence centers in 2014 means women who are not victims/ survivors/ or who are over 50 without small children and who do not qualify for services from county agencies will have nowhere to turn especially in rural areas.” – Dion Terry, Ed.D., M.P.A., Former Executive Director, Women’s Resource Center in Alamance County

There is still much more education work to be done. Please target your efforts to members appointed to the Appropriations Committee. Funding is currently approved until FY 2014 but the 36% reduction will require programs to cut workforce stabilization services. 

Senate Conferees: Sen. Peter S. BrunstetterChair; Sen. Harry BrownSen. Neal HuntSen. Tom ApodacaSen. Bill RabonSen. Ralph Hise

House Conferees: Rep. Nelson DollarChair; Rep. Justin P. BurrRep. Linda P. JohnsonRep. Bryan R. HollowayRep. John A. TorbettRep. Phil ShepardRep. William D. BrissonRep. Marilyn AvilaRep. Mark W. HolloRep. D. Craig HornRep. Chuck McGradyRep. Hugh BlackwellRep. N. Leo DaughtryRep. Pat B. HurleyRep. James L. Boles, Jr.Rep. John FairclothRep. Roger WestRep. Pat McElraftRep. George G. ClevelandRep. Rayne BrownRep. Jason SaineRep. Tim MooreRep. David R. Lewis

Thank you so much for your great support of women and families!  

Areas of Support

Join Our Email List