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Gender-based Violence: A Global “Silent” Epidemic

Gender-based Violence: A Global “Silent” Epidemic

1 in 3 women globally in 2010 experienced violence at the hands of an intimate partner. In 20 of 24 countries, most women tell no one they experienced violence. On average, only seven percent of women who experienced violence ever reported it to a formal source.

Early last month, The Daily Beast covered an alarming study on global gender-based violence. In this study assisted by Amber Peterman, of University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and Jennifer Bleck, lead researcher Tia Palermo reveals the silence and obscurity of gender-based violence. Around the world, gender-based violence is being overlooked, as victims fear coming forward, along with numerous systems that fail to protect women. Gender-based violence is any act of physical, sexual, psychological or economic harm or suffering, whether occurring in public or in private, based on one’s gender.

“Women don’t trust the formal sector,” said Ravi Verma, director of the Asia Regional Office in New Delhi of the D.C.-based International Center for Research on Women. “The police system is deeply entrenched into the same notions of patriarchy and gender inequitable perspectives and women don’t feel comfortable that they will be heard or their report will be taken in the right spirit.”

Instead, women are more likely to turn to friends and family. Women have found that formal institutions don’t work in low-income or underdeveloped areas; therefore, they seek help from those they can trust.

Among the top reasons for women not reporting abuse were embarrassment, fear, a belief that disclosure was pointless, and the notion that women must endure violence because it is a normal part of life.

Compass Center for Women and Families offers domestic violence crisis services, including support groups and a 24-hour crisis hotline: 919-929-7122. If you or someone you know may be experiencing abuse, we are here to listen and lend support.

For more information on this report, click here for The Daily Beast’s article.

Use Twitter to Find Your Next Job

Use Twitter to Find Your Next Job

Social media is increasingly becoming more important to employers. Twitter is a great resource to use in your job search. Mashable shared websites and Twitter handles for you to follow. These resources can assist you in finding your next career.

TwitJobSearch: This site allows you to search for jobs posted on Twitter using keywords (for example, “Marketing in New York”).

TweetMyJobs: TweetMyJobs will send you personalized job listings via email, Twitter or your mobile device.

Twellow: Twellow organizes Twitter users by category, making it easier to find the right recruiters and influencers to follow in your job search.

@JobHuntOrg: Susan P. Joyce tweets on behalf of Job-Hunt.org, posting U.S. job listings, career advice and helpful articles for job seekers.

@LinkedIn_Jobs: As the premier social media resource for professionals, connecting to LinkedIn is a must for modern job seekers.

@CraigslistJobs: Incorporate Craigslist into your Twitter feed to receive job postings from across the United States.

@UndercoverRec: This Twitter feed from the social media marketing firm LinkHumans shares articles about cover letters, resume building and interviewing tips from the Undercover Recruiter blog.

@HeatherHuhman: Heather R. Huhman, founder of the content and digital marketing PR firm Come Recommended, doles out job advice tailored to Gen Y job seekers.

@BrazenCareerist: Tweets from the Brazen Careerist website include links to webinars, virtual career fairs and recruitment events.

@Careerealism: From the website of the same name, Careerealism shares no-nonsense blog posts about recruitment and networking.

In addition to these resources, it is important to maintain a professional image on your social networks. While these can be used to share updates on your personal life, “think before you tweet.” Write a Twitter bio that will give potential employers a snapshot of your qualities. Also, be sure your profile image is professional.

An Evening of Story and Song Raises Nearly $15,000!

An Evening of Story and Song Raises Nearly $15,000!

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It was a little bit difficult last Friday night to discern who was having more fun at the Varsity Theater…the audience or the performers?! Local authors Lee Smith and Jill McCorkle teamed up with Nashville musicians Marshall Chapman and Matraca Berg to thrill the packed house at the Varsity with readings from the authors, lovely songs from the musicians and occasional music from all four! Lee Smith capped the evening by reminding all that some can write music, some can write stories, but all can extend support to Compass Center. When the lights had gone out and the artists finished signing merchandise, nearly $15,000 had come in to support Compass Center’s important work in the community. Big thanks to everyone that attended this wonderful and exciting event and to our generous sponsors — Molly Maid of Chapel Hill, Foster’s Market, Grapevine Distributors, the Varsity Theater, and Flyleaf Books.

Photo credit: Caperton Morton

LGBT Teens at Higher Risk of Being Victims of Domestic Violence

LGBT Teens at Higher Risk of Being Victims of Domestic Violence

According to the 2013 study, “Technology, Teen Dating Violence and Abuse, and Bullying” by Urban Institute, lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender teenagers are at a greater risk of dating abuse than heterosexuals.

Of the 3, 745 youth in 7th to 12th grades, in New York, Pennsylvania and New Jersey surveyed in the study, 6 percent of the respondents identified as LGBT.

Of the respondents:

  • 43 percent reported being victims of physical dating violence, compared to 29 percent of heterosexual youth.
  • 59 percent reported emotional abuse, compared to 46 percent of heterosexual youth.
  • 37 percent reported digital abuse and harassment, compared to 26 percent of heterosexual youth.
  • 23 percent reported sexual coercion, compared to 12 percent of heterosexual youth.

Compass Center for Women and Families offers domestic violence crisis services to women, men and families. We work with women and men, regardless of sexual orientation, who are experiencing or have experienced emotional, verbal, physical, sexual or other forms of abuse. We provide information and options and allow those we assist to make their own choices about the best options for them. We can also help people who are unsure if their relationship is abusive and would like to talk to someone about this.

If you  or someone you know is in need of our services, call our 24-hour hotline: 919-929-7122 , or email Susan Friedman, Director of Domestic Violence Crisis Services.

Shop at Ten Thousand Villages on Dec. 19, 4-8 p.m.

Shop at Ten Thousand Villages on Dec. 19, 4-8 p.m.

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Ten Thousand Villages strives to create opportunities for artisans in developing countries to earn income by bringing their products and stories to our market through long-term fair trading relationships. Next Thursday, December 19, we will partner with Ten Thousand Villages for an in-store event to benefit women and families in our local community, as well as expose our friends and family to world artisan crafts, jewelry and personal accessories. Please join us at Ten Thousand Villages as we connect globally this holiday season.

Ten Thousand Villages
Shops at Eastgate (1800 E. Franklin St)
Thursday, Dec. 19
4-8 p.m.

We look forward to seeing you there!

Photos from the Royal Ball – October 4, 2013

Photos from the Royal Ball – October 4, 2013

On October 4, The Greater Chapel Hill Association of Realtors hosted The Royal Ball for the benefit of Family Violence and Domestic Abuse Victims in observance of Domestic Violence Awareness Month. Sabrina Short attended and took these wonderful photos!

 

 

 

 

How the Affordable Care Act (ACA) Affects Our Work

How the Affordable Care Act (ACA) Affects Our Work

On October 23, Futures without Violence in San Francisco, CA hosted a webinar titled “What Domestic Violence Advocated Need to Know About How New Health Policy Changes Can Help Survivors of Domestic Violence.” Domestic Violence victims have historically faced health care discrimination and with these new changes of increased screening and counseling, there will be an increased number of patients identified as domestic violence victims. As a result, we should see an increase in the number of individuals needing domestic violence services. Below are highlights from this webinar. To view resources from the webinar, visit Futures without Violence’s website. For additional information, visit healthcare.gov.

  • As part of the ACA (aka Obamacare aka Health Reform) –
    • Beginning 08/2012 – health plans must cover screening and counseling for lifetime exposure to DV and IPV as core women’s preventive health benefit
    • Beginning 01/2014 – insurance companies are prohibited from denying coverage to victims of DV as preexisting condition
    • Home visitation (programs for new moms or moms-to-be to help them with issues) – there are new federal benchmarks for home visitation for DV screening
  • ACA offers Marketplaces (“Exchanges”) as new way to buy private health insurance – Insurance coverage starts 01/01/2014
    • All plans on ACA Marketplace must include these benefits: Ambulatory, Maternity/newborn care, Mental health and substance abuse treatment, Prescription drugs, Preventive and wellness services (this includes IPV services!), Etc.
    • Who is eligible?
      • Live in state served by Marketplace, be a citizen or national of US, not incarcerated
      • Lawfully present immigrants (including individuals who are subject to 5-year immigration bar)
      • Undocumented immigrants cannot get coverage, but they can get coverage for their lawfully present relatives
    • Enrollment Assistance
  • Medicaid 101
    • Implications of state NOT expanding Medicaid (We did not expand Medicaid, so this applies to us in NC)
      • Nearly all children, adults, as well as parents with incomes above current eligibility levels, will be ineligible for Medicaid
      • None of the states NOT expanding Medicaid offer separate Medicaid-comparable coverage for childless adults
      • Adults below 100% FPL but above current state eligibility (median 42% FPL) will not be eligible for federal help to buy private coverage
      • In other words, this population likely remains uninsured in Sates that don’t expand Medicaid
    • Medicaid Benefits
      • Coverage for expansion populations will be offered through Alternative Benefit Packages
        • Medicaid Managed Care
      • Must include Essential Health Benefits package in ABP(including screening for IPV)
      • Important to remember that these are coverage requirement, not new requirements for providers
    • New ACA Benefits for Women
      • Women will have new access to coverage of a range of preventive health screenings, including a package of women’s preventive services
      • This includes screening and brief counseling for IPV
  • Screening and Brief Counseling for DV/IPV
    • What does screening cover?
      • Broadly defined and will vary from plan to plan
      • HHS says that it may consist of a few, brief, open-ended questions
      • Futures can provide examples of screening tools – such as brochure-based assessment – which can be effective
    • What does brief counseling cover?
      • Counseling benefit is not defined and will vary from plan to plan
      • HHS has said that counseling provides basic information, referrals, tools, safety plans, and provider education tools
    • How often can a woman receive the benefit?
      • At least 1 per year
      • No federal restrictions on the number of times a plan will reimburse for screening and counseling
      • Plans will set limits on what they will cover
    • Where does screening/brief counseling take place?
      • Anywhere; no limits on settings where screening can take place
      • Plans will make setting-specific decisions
      • Advocates may have role in reaching out to plans and encouraging a comprehensive response!
  • How might this impact DV/SA programs?
    • Recommendations for more screening/brief counseling could result in:
      • Increased referrals (eventually)
      • Increased training requests
      • New partnerships
      • Unintended consequences (reporting, privacy, poorly trained providers)
      • Reaching more women with prevention and intervention messages
      • May eventually create new funding streams
    • What can you do?
      • Advocates as part of care team:
        • Health Resource Center is developing a memo on examples of reimbursement strategies for providers and advocates
        • Advocates as part of healthcare team

UPCOMING EVENT: An Evening of Story and Song with Lee Smith, Jill McCorkle, Marshall Chapman and Matraca Berg | SOLD OUT!

UPCOMING EVENT: An Evening of Story and Song with Lee Smith, Jill McCorkle, Marshall Chapman and Matraca Berg | SOLD OUT!

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Tea with Lee is taking to the big stage this year. Please join Compass Center as the Good Ol’ Girls reunite for an exciting Evening of Story and Song with Lee Smith, Jill McCorkle, Marshall Chapman and Matraca Berg on Friday, December 6. Lee Smith will be joined by fellow author Jill McCorkle and Nashville headlining musicians Marshall Chapman and Matraca Berg for an evening of story and song at the Varsity Theater.

Lee, Jill, Marshall and Matraca are the voices behind the popular Good Ol’ Girls musical, adapted and directed by UNC’s own Paul Ferguson, which Creative Loafing referred to as a “Southern classic.” The show will combine great music with fabulous down-home stories, all in support and celebration of women and families in our community. Don’t miss out on this special show, which is sure to be a good ol’ time!

Tickets for this event are sold out!

6 p.m. – Private reception will include appetizers with the artists!

7 p.m. – An Evening of story and song with Lee Smith, Jill McCorkle, Marshall Chapman and Matraca Berg

An Evening of Story and Song is generously supported by Molly Maid, Foster’s Market and Grapevine Distributors.

For information on downtown Chapel Hill parking, click here.

Photos From Business After Hours – October 17, 2013

Photos From Business After Hours – October 17, 2013

On October 17, PTA Thrift Shop celebrated the ribbon cutting of their newest location and hosted one of Chapel Hill Chamber of Commerce’s Business After Hours. Compass Center for Women and Families, along with Extraordinary ventures were featured as nonprofit spotlights. Chapelboro.com attended and took these wonderful photos!

For more information on Compass Center’s Domestic Violence Awareness Month events, click here.

Six Tips for Helping a Loved One You Believe Is Being Abused

Six Tips for Helping a Loved One You Believe Is Being Abused
  1. Tell your loved one that she/ he don’t deserve to be treated badly and that no one deserves to be abused. This abuse is not their fault.
  1. Let your loved one know that there are ways to increase his/her safety, that she/he has options, and that, together, you can get the help that is needed. Compass Center for Women and Families can assist with the safety planning and with understanding options for dealing with the abusive situation.
  1. Tell this person what you have noticed that concerns you. Tell them that you believe (or know)  she/he is being hurt or controlled. Tell him/her that you are concerned for his/her safety.
  1. Avoid focusing on the abuser. Keep this person out of the conversation as much as possible. Remember -your loved one has strong feelings for this person. Focus on your loved one, his/her safety, and your love and concern for him/her.
  1. Encourage him/her to call the Compass Center for Women and Families 24-hour hotline to speak with an advocate or to come in for an appointment.
  1. As the loved one of someone who is being abused you can call Compass Center for Women and Families hotline and receive support, information and abuse education.
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